Our Future Workspaces: Judicial System

We are in possibly the most important period of change that we are likely to see in our lifetime. We are not certain how our world will be shaped by technology, or what the future of workspaces will look like. Workplace of the future in the Judicial system.

We are in possibly the most important period of change that we are likely to see in our lifetime.

We are not certain how our world will be shaped by technology, or what the future of workspaces will look like. Working in the industry that I do, I often get to spend time with forward-thinking technologists who are at the coalface in terms of shaping the workspaces of the future. I recently interviewed an avid Technologist and Senior Digital Transformation Architect for the Department of Justice, to get some insight into changes to the judicial system.

He has over 20 years of experience across multiple industries in the realm of digital transformation and is part of a team looking to revolutionise the user experience of the justice system through automation and practical improvements.

Current trends in the judicial system

Currently, most of the projects being undertaken by the department focus on ensuring products and services are able to be delivered safely in terms of preventing the transmission of coronavirus. These products are heavily remote and automation focused, enabling people to access the system from anywhere, at any time.

Courts and judicial spaces are being reserved for essential cases, meaning disputes and claims have to be resolved online. This has enhanced access to the system for many, enabling people to engage with services from the comfort of their own homes, resulting in reducing court backlogs, and creating efficiencies across the system.

What will the future of the judicial system look like?

Digitisation will continue to be a driving force for innovation across the department, allowing people to engage more easily with service providers, and remotely access data. The judicial system is already moving towards semi-automation, where captured data is used to communicate confidentially and preemptively, informing users through faster access to information.

Automation through openly shared information does however raise privacy concerns, and needs to be an ongoing consideration. How receptive users are to these new technologies is also an issue, and an ongoing discussion is underway to understand the best way to incentivise customers for engaging and sharing information.

How technological changes will support digitisation and innovation

When changes are made to the framework of technologies that support the judicial system, the constant need for development and deployments are a drain on resources. Low code tools that allow for drag and drop deployments are being developed to revolutionise the way these processes can be updated.

With simplified workflow applications, anyone can build and streamline their tasks to create bespoke and functional processes.

This will increase the demand for ‘time to market tools’ professionals, who are key to the future of this technology. Product owners/coaches will also help businesses train and uplift users to embrace change and enable creativity.

How to approach future workspaces

As change is inevitable, having an open mind is the key to growth. Be willing to share and embrace information, and be open to ideas and other mindsets and processes.

If there’s an opportunity to try something new, introduce it purposely and see how the business adapts to it.

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